Basin is a census-designated place (CDP) in Jefferson County, Montana, United States. It lies about 10 miles (16 km) southeast of the Continental Divide in a high narrow canyon along Interstate 15 about halfway between Butte and Helena. Basin Creek flows roughly north to south through Basin and enters the Boulder River on the settlement's south side. The population was 255 at the 2000 census. Archaeologists have discovered evidence of human habitation from 10,000 years ago at a site near Clancy, 20 miles (32 km) from Basin. From about 2000 BCE through the mid-19th century, nomadic tribes hunted bison in the grassy valleys that trend east, away from the Rocky Mountains and into the plains. By the time miners found gold in the streams in and near Basin, most of the these tribes of Indians had been forced onto reservations by the U.S. government. Basin rests above the Boulder Batholith, the host rock for many valuable mineral ores found in this part of Montana. After the town became a hub of gold and silver mining, Basin's population peaked at about 1,500 in first decade of the 20th century but gradually declined as the mines were depleted. Abandoned mining equipment, closed or barricaded mine portals, and the ruins of a smelter and ore concentrator remain in Basin in the 21st century. Historic buildings from Basin's heyday form much of the core of the CDP's small business district, which includes a fire station, a post office, two restaurants, a bar, a commercial gallery, small specialty shops, and the nonprofit Montana Artists Refuge. Basin has a small elementary school, its own water system, and a low-power radio station. Local volunteers and elected trustees provide limited services to the settlement, but it relies on the government of Jefferson County, Montana, for law enforcement and other services.

Administrative Law Lawyers In Basin Montana

What is administrative law?

Administrative Law involves compliance with and challenges to rules, regulations, and orders of local, state, and federal government departments. Administrative law attorneys may represent clients before agencies like the workers compensation appeals boards, school board disciplinary hearings and federal agencies like the Federal Communications Commission. Administrative attorneys help negotiate the bureaucracy when interacting with the government to do things as varied as receiving a license or permit or preparing and presenting a defense to disciplinary or enforcement actions.

Answers to administrative law issues in Montana

Administrative law is law made by or about the executive branch agencies, departments, the President (at the federal...

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