Hilham is an unincorporated community in Overton County, Tennessee, in the southeastern United States. The community is centered around the junction of Tennessee State Route 136 (which runs north-to-south) and Tennessee State Route 85 (which runs east-to-west). Although not a census-designated place, Hilham is part of a Zip Code Tabulation Area (38568) that covers most of rural northwest Overton County. As of the 2000 census, the population of this entire area was less than 2000. Hilham was established in 1797 by an idealistic Dartmouth graduate named Moses Fisk (1759-1840), who believed the site was the geographic center of the United States (at the time, the Mississippi River was still the nation's western boundary). Fisk laid out Hilham so that roads radiated out from the center of the community to the north, south, east and west, believing that Hilham would eventually be the ultimate crossroads of the new nation. In 1806, Fisk established one of the first female academies in the southeast at Hilham. The 11,000-acre (45 km) Standing Stone State Park and Forest is located just 5 miles (8.0 km) north of Hilham along TN-136.

Administrative Law Lawyers In Hilham Tennessee

What is administrative law?

Administrative Law involves compliance with and challenges to rules, regulations, and orders of local, state, and federal government departments. Administrative law attorneys may represent clients before agencies like the workers compensation appeals boards, school board disciplinary hearings and federal agencies like the Federal Communications Commission. Administrative attorneys help negotiate the bureaucracy when interacting with the government to do things as varied as receiving a license or permit or preparing and presenting a defense to disciplinary or enforcement actions.

Answers to administrative law issues in Tennessee

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Federal court opinions concerning administrative law in Tennessee