Coinjock is an unincorporated community in Currituck County, North Carolina. It is located on U.S. Route 158 between Barco and Grandy, about 20 miles (32 km) south of the Virginia state line, and is at mile marker 50 on the Intracoastal Waterway. The island to the east of Coinjock in the Currituck Sound has a village called Waterlily, which uses the postal address of Coinjock as well. This island is also known as Church's Island by locals because of a decayed church that was once a landmark of the tiny community. Coinjock is bordered by Currituck Sound to the east; the North River lies to the west. Its Zip code is 27923. Residents suggest the name Coinjock is of Native American origin referring to mulberries, which might have been prevalent in the area many years ago. There are no mulberry trees there now. The name has also been spelled Coenjock, Cowenjock, or Cornjack and sometimes as two words with the second beginning with a capital J. Bishop Thomas Coke visited Coenjock, as he called it, and preached to a small congregation in its chapel on March 19, 1785.

Antitrust And Trade Regulation Law Lawyers In Coinjock North Carolina

What is antitrust and trade regulation law?

Antitrust and Trade Regulation laws aim to promote free competition in the marketplace. Agreements or cooperative efforts by two or more entities that affects or restrains competitors is illegal under these laws. The Sherman Act makes illegal any contract, combination, or conspiracy in restraint of trade or commerce and makes monopolies and attempts, combinations, or conspiracies to monopolize illegal. The Clayton Act regulate price discrimination, tying and exclusive dealing contracts, stock acquisition and interlocking directorates.

Answers to antitrust and trade regulation law issues in North Carolina

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