Gladwyne is a suburban community in Montgomery County, Pennsylvania, United States along the Main Line. The population was 4,050 at the 2000 census. As Gladwyne is neither an incorporated area nor a census-designated place, all data is for the ZIP code 19035, with which the community is . There are four churches, a synagogue, a library, two schools, the Gladwyne fire company, the Gladwyne Civic Association, the Stony Lane Swim Club, playgrounds, parks, businesses, and retail shops within the confines of Gladwyne. The village is also home to the Philadelphia Country Club on its periphery and to The Courts, a private tennis club. Because the town was early to preserve space and has received many donations of land, developers have not subdivided the area into more typical suburban developments, so the area retains a mixture of farm, colonial town, and late 19th/early 20th housing uncharacteristic of other Main Line communities. Industrialist James Crosby Brown of the Pennsylvania Railroad built a 185-acre estate that upon his death was divided into non-divisible (deed-restricted) lots of three to seventeen acres, an early act of (partial) preservation that set an important precedent for future acts by both individuals and the township. The Lower Merion Conservancy plays a significant role in protecting the local heritage and maintains its office in Gladwyne's Rolling Hill Park.

Appellate Law Lawyers In Gladwyne Pennsylvania

What is appellate law?

Practicing in the Appellate Courts is for the purpose of reviewing trial court judgments to correct of errors committed by the trial court, development of the law, achieve a uniform approach across courts, and the pursuit of justice, more generally. Appellate courts are not a forum to make a new case, but instead they determine if the rulings and judgment of the court below were made correctly.

Answers to appellate law issues in Pennsylvania

The following is a short overview of appellate law. Appellate rules vary from state to state, and between the state...

An appeal is the process of having a higher court review a lower court's decision. Appeals can be from criminal and...