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Appellate Law Lawyers In Green Bay Wisconsin

Green Bay is a city in and the county seat of Brown County in the U.S. state of Wisconsin, located at the head of Green Bay, a sub-basin of Lake Michigan, at the mouth of the Fox River. It has an elevation of 581 feet (177 m) above sea level and is located 112 miles (180 km) north of Milwaukee. As of the 2000 census Green Bay had a population of 102,313. Its 2008 estimated census was 101,025. The Town of Green Bay is located several miles northeast of the city. It is the third-largest city in the state of Wisconsin, after Milwaukee and Madison. It is also the third-largest city on the west shore of Lake Michigan, after Chicago and Milwaukee. Green Bay is the principal city of the Green Bay Metropolitan Statistical Area, which covers Brown, Kewaunee, and Oconto Counties and had a combined population of 282,599 at the 2000 census. The 2008 estimated population of the Green Bay metropolitan area is 302,935. Green Bay is an industrial city with several meatpacking and paper plants, and a port on the Bay of Green Bay, an arm of Lake Michigan. It is home to the National Railroad Museum; the Neville Public Museum with exhibitions of art, history, and science; and the University of Wisconsin–Green Bay. The Green Bay Packers professional football team was formed in the city in 1919 and joined the National Football League in 1921. Green Bay is by far the smallest market with an NFL team, although the Packers are avidly supported in the larger Milwaukee market and throughout Wisconsin. Green Bay is nicknamed "Titletown, USA" for the number of NFL titles (12) it has won over the years, more than any other NFL team. The name appears on the city seal, is used by the Green Bay Chamber of Commerce for its web address and variations of the word appear in the name of more than two dozen local businesses. Green Bay was awarded the title of All-America City twice in the city's history, in 1964, and 1999.

What is appellate law?

Practicing in the Appellate Courts is for the purpose of reviewing trial court judgments to correct of errors committed by the trial court, development of the law, achieve a uniform approach across courts, and the pursuit of justice, more generally. Appellate courts are not a forum to make a new case, but instead they determine if the rulings and judgment of the court below were made correctly.

Answers to appellate law issues in Wisconsin

The following is a short overview of appellate law. Appellate rules vary from state to state, and between the state...

An appeal is the process of having a higher court review a lower court's decision. Appeals can be from criminal and...