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Business Bankruptcy Law Lawyers In Cashiers North Carolina

Cashiers is a census-designated place and unincorporated village located in southern Jackson County, North Carolina. As of the 2000 census, the community had a total population of 196. During the season, the population swells to 20,000 (May to October)Cashiers is pronounced locally as if it were spelled cashers, and is one of a few communities in the area popular with tourists and owners of vacation homes. The town is served by U.S. 64 to Highlands (west) and Rosman (east), and N.C. 107 to Sylva (north) and Walhalla. The village is centered around the crossroads of the two. It 2003, the North Carolina General Assembly passed local legislation allowing Cashiers to incorporate as a village, however this was turned down by a vote of 161 to 302 in a local referendum on August 12. In North Carolina, the village status would allow it to have its own government and levy taxes, but not require it to provide any services as cities must, and not allow it any extraterritorial jurisdiction as towns have. It was apparently the issue of potential taxes that caused the referendum to be turned down. Instead, the county created zoning for Cashiers, which does not exist for most of the county, even in other similar places like Dillsboro. The zoning council for Cashiers is run by the county, therefore there are no extra local taxes supporting it. Cashiers has a charter as a town from 1927, but this is now inactive as it has had no actual government for some time, if ever. Since this has never been repealed, it is unclear why it could not be reactivated instead. The new village would have had a council-manager government. Five properties near Cashiers are listed on the National Register of Historic Places—Camp Merrie-Woode, the Church of the Good Shepherd, Fairfield Inn, the High Hampton Inn Historic District, and the Mordecai Zachary House.

What is business bankruptcy law?

Business Bankruptcy involves the legal process that insolvent businesses take to insure fairness and equality upon creditors and to help the debtor company start anew with the property the company is allowed to keep without being hampered by their liabilities. Business Bankruptcy attorneys advise on debt relief options and guide companies through each phase of a federal bankruptcy filing -- including Chapter 7 bankruptcy debt discharge plans and Chapter 11 bankruptcy debt reorganization plans. Bankruptcy attorneys may also represent creditors seeking to have their rights enforced in connection with the bankruptcy reorganization of a debtor.

Personal Bankruptcy attorneys also advise on debt relief options and guide individuals through each phase of a federal bankruptcy filing.

Answers to business bankruptcy law issues in North Carolina

There are six basic types of bankruptcy cases provided for under the Bankruptcy Code, each of which is discussed...

Official Bankruptcy Forms must be used to file and take action in bankruptcy cases. Procedural Forms also may be...

Chapter 7 of the Bankruptcy Code provides for "liquidation," ( i.e., the sale of a debtor's nonexempt property and...

Chapter 9 of the Bankruptcy Code provides for reorganization of municipalities (which includes cities and towns, as...

Chapter 11 of the Bankruptcy Code provides (generally) for reorganization, usually involving a corporation or...

Chapter 12 of the Bankruptcy Code provides for adjustment of debts of a "family farmer," or a "family fisherman" as...

Chapter 15 is a new chapter added to the Bankruptcy Code by the Bankruptcy Abuse Prevention and Consumer Protection...

Although the Bankruptcy Code provides for a stockbroker liquidation proceeding (11 U.S.C. ยง 741 et seq.), it is far...

Most debtors who file a bankruptcy petition, and many of their creditors, know very little about the bankruptcy...

Laws prohibit debt collectors from using abusive or deceptive tactics to collect a debt. Unfortunately, many...

Federal court opinions concerning business bankruptcy law in North Carolina