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Civil Rights Law Lawyers In New York New York

New York is the most populous city in the United States, and the center of the New York metropolitan area, which is one of the most populous urban areas in the world. A leading global city, New York exerts a powerful influence over global commerce, finance, culture, fashion and entertainment. As host of the United Nations headquarters, it is also an important center for international affairs. The city is often referred to as New York City or The City of New York to distinguish it from the state of New York, of which it is a part. Located on a large natural harbor on the Atlantic coast of the Northeastern United States, the city consists of five boroughs: The Bronx, Brooklyn, Manhattan, Queens, and Staten Island. The city's 2008 estimated population exceeds 8.3 million people, and with a land area of 305 square miles (790 km), New York City is the most densely populated major city in the United States. The New York metropolitan area's population is also the nation's largest, estimated at 18.8 million people over 6,720 square miles (17,400 km). Furthermore, the Combined Statistical Area containing the Greater New York metropolitan area contained 22.155 million people as of 2008 Census estimates, also the largest in the United States. New York was founded as a commercial trading post by the Dutch in 1624. The settlement was called New Amsterdam until 1664 when the colony came under English control. New York served as the capital of the United States from 1785 until 1790. It has been the country's largest city since 1790. Many districts and landmarks in the city have become well known to outsiders. The Statue of Liberty greeted millions of immigrants as they came to America in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Wall Street, in Lower Manhattan, has been a premier global financial center since World War II and is home to the New York Stock Exchange, the world's largest stock exchange by market capitalization of its listed companies. The city has been home to several of the tallest buildings in the world, including the Empire State Building and the twin towers of the former World Trade Center. The city is the birthplace of many cultural movements, including the Harlem Renaissance in literature and visual art; abstract expressionism (also known as the New York School) in painting; hip hop, punk, salsa, disco, freestyle, and Tin Pan Alley in music; and is the home of Broadway theater. New York is notable among American cities for its high use of mass transit, most of which runs 24 hours a day, and for the density and diversity of its population. In 2005, nearly 170 languages were spoken in the city and 36% of its population was born outside the United States. Sometimes referred to as "The City That Never Sleeps," the city has also been nicknamed, "The Capital of the World," "The City," "Gotham," and the "Big Apple."

What is civil rights law?

A civil right is an enforceable right or privilege, which if interfered with by another gives rise to an action for injury. Examples of civil rights are freedom of speech, press, and assembly; the right to vote; freedom from involuntary servitude; and the right to equality in public places. Discrimination occurs when the civil rights of an individual are denied or interfered with because of their membership in a particular group or class. Statutes have been enacted to prevent discrimination based on race, sex, religion, age, previous condition of servitude, physical limitation, national origin, and in some instances sexual preference. Civil rights attorneys handle cases involving the rights of individuals to be free from unequal treatment (or discrimination) based on legally-protected characteristics such as race, gender, disability, national origin, age, sexual orientation, and religion. Civil rights cases can arise in a number of settings -- including employment, housing, lending, and education.

Answers to civil rights law issues in New York

Under federal laws, it is illegal to discriminate against someone (applicant or employee) because of that person's...

The law forbids discrimination because of...

Harassment is a form of employment discrimination that may violate Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, the...

It is unlawful to harass a person (an applicant or employee) because of that person’s sex. Harassment can include "...

The Equal Pay Act requires that men and women in the same workplace be given equal pay for equal work. The jobs need...

It is illegal to fire, demote, refuse to promote, harass, or otherwise “retaliate” against people (applicants or...

Your battle to beat a ticket or worse begins the instant you realize you're being pulled over by a police officer....

In certain kinds of cases, lawyers charge what is called a contingency fee. Instead of billing by the hour, the...