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Collections Law Lawyers In Whitehouse New Jersey

Whitehouse is a village in Readington Township, New Jersey along the Jersey Turnpike, just west of Mechanicsville. In 1722, Abraham Van Horn purchased 490 acres in Readington along the Rockaway Creek. He built a grist mill and saw mill here. Around 1750, he built a white plastered wall tavern on the creek where the Jersey Turnpike crossed (this is now the corner of Washington Street and US 22). The tavern began to be referred to as the "White House" by travellers. The village, which sprang up to the east of the tavern also carried this name. Stones from the original tavern can be seen along the retaining wall of the DAR cemetery, where the tavern once stood. The village of White House stretched along the Jersey Turnpike (now Route 22 and Old Route 28), which was the main street. The village included taverns, stores, grist mills, an academy, a Dutch Reformed Church and numerous houses. The nearby Whitehouse Station, which also indirectly took the name from the tavern, was not built up until 1848 when an extension of the Somerville and Easton Railroad was built.

What is collections law?

Lawyers who practice collections law assist creditors in the collection and satisfaction of outstanding debt, including car loans, student loans, credit cards, judgments, medical debts, mortgage debt, enforcement of rights under liens, and recovery of court-ordered judgments. Debt collections attorneys may also assist clients in repossessing the real and personal property of insolvent debtors.

Personal Bankruptcy and Business Bankruptcy attorneys can advise on debt relief options and guide individuals through each phase of a federal bankruptcy filing.

Answers to collections law issues in New Jersey

There are six basic types of bankruptcy cases provided for under the Bankruptcy Code, each of which is discussed...

Laws prohibit debt collectors from using abusive or deceptive tactics to collect a debt. Unfortunately, many...

For the most part, a creditor must sue you, obtain a court judgment, and then solicit the help of a sheriff or other...

This varies from state to state and lender to lender, but most lenders don't start foreclosure proceedings until you...