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Collections Law Lawyers In Tyrone Pennsylvania

Tyrone is a borough in Blair County, Pennsylvania, 15 miles (24 km) northeast of Altoona, on the Little Juniata River. Tyrone was of considerable commercial importance in the twentieth century. It was an outlet for the Clearfield coal fields, and it was noted for the manufacture of paper products. There were planing mills, and chemical and candy factories. In 1900, 5,847 people lived here; in 1910, 7,176; and in 1940, 8,845 people resided here. The population was 5,528 at the 2000 census. It is part of the Altoona, PA Metropolitan Statistical Area. It was named after County Tyrone in Ireland. Located along the main lines of the Norfolk Southern and Nittany and Bald Eagle railroads, and US-220, PA-453, and I-99 highways, Tyrone was at one time known as "The Hub of the Highways. " In those days four railroads [Pennsylvania, Tyrone and Clearfield, Tyrone and Lock Haven, Lewisburg and Tyrone] and three main highways [US-220, PA-350, PA-453] converged there. Prior to the development of the railroads through the state, Tyrone was on the Main Line Canal, Juniata Division, of the Pennsylvania Canal system.

What is collections law?

Lawyers who practice collections law assist creditors in the collection and satisfaction of outstanding debt, including car loans, student loans, credit cards, judgments, medical debts, mortgage debt, enforcement of rights under liens, and recovery of court-ordered judgments. Debt collections attorneys may also assist clients in repossessing the real and personal property of insolvent debtors.

Personal Bankruptcy and Business Bankruptcy attorneys can advise on debt relief options and guide individuals through each phase of a federal bankruptcy filing.

Answers to collections law issues in Pennsylvania

There are six basic types of bankruptcy cases provided for under the Bankruptcy Code, each of which is discussed...

Laws prohibit debt collectors from using abusive or deceptive tactics to collect a debt. Unfortunately, many...

For the most part, a creditor must sue you, obtain a court judgment, and then solicit the help of a sheriff or other...

This varies from state to state and lender to lender, but most lenders don't start foreclosure proceedings until you...