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Consumer Protection Law Lawyers In Jackpot Nevada

Jackpot is an unincorporated town in Elko County, Nevada. In 2005 it was estimated to have a population of 1,416. Located less than 1 mile (1.6 kilometers) from the Idaho border on U.S. Route 93, Jackpot has been a popular casino gaming destination for residents of Idaho and other neighboring states since its founding. Jackpot is located approximately 45 miles (75 km) south of Twin Falls, Idaho, a city of approximately 40,000. Although officially part of the Elko Micropolitan Statistical Area, Jackpot is often considered part of the Greater Twin Falls region. After Idaho outlawed all forms of casino gaming in 1954, "Cactus Pete" Piersanti and Don French moved their slot machine operations from Idaho to the Jackpot townsite. Piersanti's and French's gaming establishments were named Cactus Pete's and the Horseshu Club respectively. Piersanti in particular is credited for founding Jackpot as well as for naming it. Cactus Pete's management took over the Horseshu in 1964 to form what would eventually become Ameristar Casinos. The Ameristar-owned Cactus Pete's and Horseshu, as well as the independent Barton's Club 93 and the Four Jacks Casino, form the basis of the town's economy to this day. Collectively Jackpot-area casinos are the largest employer in southern Idaho. In addition to its casino industry, Jackpot has its own schools, golf course, and post office. Due to its economic ties with southern Idaho, particularly the Magic Valley region, Jackpot observes Mountain Time, (one of five locations), although it is officially, like the rest of Nevada other than West Wendover, in the Pacific Time Zone.

What is consumer protection law?

Consumer protection refers to the laws designed to aid retail consumers of goods and services that have been improperly manufactured, delivered, performed, handled, or described. Such laws provide the retail consumer with additional protections and remedies not generally provided to merchants and others who engage in business transactions, on the premise that the consumers do not enjoy a sufficient bargaining position with respect to the businessmen with whom they deal and therefore should not be strictly limited by the legal rules that govern recovery for damages among businessmen. The overarching goal is to protect individuals and the interest of the public in general from unfair and misleading activity in business and commerce (such as false advertising and deceptive trade practices) and scams perpetrated by criminals (such as identity theft and pyramid schemes) that harm a substantial number of consumers.

Answers to consumer protection law issues in Nevada

In certain kinds of cases, lawyers charge what is called a contingency fee. Instead of billing by the hour, the...

Generally, yes. A warranty (also called a guarantee) is an assurance about the quality of goods or services you buy...

Federal and state laws prohibit "unfair or deceptive trade acts or practices." If you think you've been cheated,...

Antitrust laws help ensure a vigorous, competitive marketplace to maintain fair prices, the availability of an array...

Because motorcycles lack the same protective enclosures and devices that other automobiles possess, they are...

Federal court opinions concerning consumer protection law in Nevada