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Criminal Appeals Law Lawyers In South Williamson Kentucky

South Williamson is an unincorporated town in the Appalachian Mountains of northeastern Pike County, Kentucky, United States, borders with West Virginia. It is separated from Williamson, West Virginia by the Tug Fork River. The town is located 28 miles east of Pikeville, Kentucky and 28 miles southwest of Logan, West Virginia, and can be accessed via U.S. Route 119. South Williamson is protected by a floodwall, built by the US Army Corps of Engineers in response to a devastating flood along the Tug Fork River in 1977. There have only been two uses of the gates thus far, the first occurred in 2002 during a major flood in the region. And the second occurred in 2003, due to anticipation of the rising river getting higher. Notably, in the late 19th century, Pike County and bordering Mingo County, West Virginia provided the setting for the Hatfield-McCoy feud, a bitter feud waged between two feuding families between 1878 and 1891 that has permeated into American History. South Williamson is home to the South Side Mall which is the only mall in the area. The local economy is largely fueled by coal mining, transportation, health care, and retail.

What is criminal appeals law?

A criminal appeal is a formal request to rehear a case that has already been decided -- a request that a new court reconsider the decision of the first court. When one or both sides of a case that has already been decided think there was a mistake made at trial, they can file an appeal. An appeal is entirely different than a jury trial. There is no testimony taken. The court of appeals decides the case entirely upon the written briefs filed by your attorney and the offie of the Attorney General who represents the prosecution and asks that the conviction be upheld.

Answers to criminal appeals law issues in Kentucky

After conviction and sentencing, a defendant has the opportunity to file an appeal of his sentence. If the conviction...