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Employment Law Lawyers In Vaughan Mississippi

Vaughan (sometimes spelled Vaughn) is an unincorporated community in Yazoo County, Mississippi, United States. It is 32 miles from the state capital of Jackson and 12 miles east of Benton. Vaughan was founded in 1830 and named for Henry Vaughan, who had established a plantation nearby. The town was established on an old stagecoach line and was for many years the main trading center of Yazoo County, including a large part of Madison County east of the Big Black River. Latitude: 32.84928 Longitude: 90.05976 Altitude: 264 feet above sea-level. The famous railroad accident that killed 37-year-old engineer Casey Jones happened near Vaughan in the early morning hours of April 30, 1900. On July 24, 1953, a ceremony was held at Vaughan, where more than 3,000 persons gathered to witness the unveiling of a bronze marker at the spot where Casey met his fate. In attendance were Sim Webb, Casey’s fireman, and Janie Jones, Casey’s widow. Beneath Casey’s name, the following legend appeared: “A famous ballad, the folklore of American railroading, and a postage stamp commemorate the colorful and courageous engineer who was killed in a wreck here in 1900. " The marker is now missing. The Casey Jones Railroad Museum State Park at Vaughan was designated a State Park on April 27, 1980. The museum began as a project of Massena Jones (no relation) in a building he owned across the road from the present site. The centerpiece of it was the damaged bell that was salvaged from the wreck site. In 2004 the museum closed. Massena Jones, a former postmaster for Vaughan and a long time resident, was also the author of a book entitled The Choo-Choo Stopped at Vaughn: a Vivid and Accurate Account of Casey Jones' Fatal Train Crash at Vaughn, Mississippi published in 1982. Vaughan was the birthplace of professional baseball player Laurin Pepper on January 18, 1931. Pepper was 23 years old when he broke into the big leagues on July 4, 1954, with the Pittsburgh Pirates. His final game was played on June 6, 1957.

What is employment law?

Employment law deals with the relationship between employees and their employer specifying the rights and restrictions applicable to the employee and employer in the workplace. Employment law differs from labor law, which primarily deals with the relationship between employers and labor organizations.

Employment law regulates such issues as employee discipline, benefits, hiring, firing, overtime and breaks, leave, payroll, health and safety in the workplace, non-compete agreements, retaliation, severance, unemployment compensation, pensions, whistleblowing, worker classification as independent contractor or employee, wage garnishment, work authorization for non-U.S. citizens, worker's compensation, and employee handbooks.

Answers to employment law issues in Mississippi

The Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) establishes minimum standards for minimum wage and...

Under federal laws, it is illegal to discriminate against someone (applicant or employee) because of that person's...

The law forbids discrimination because of...

Harassment is a form of employment discrimination that may violate Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, the...

It is unlawful to harass a person (an applicant or employee) because of that person’s sex. Harassment can include "...

The Equal Pay Act requires that men and women in the same workplace be given equal pay for equal work. The jobs need...

It is illegal to fire, demote, refuse to promote, harass, or otherwise “retaliate” against people (applicants or...

Employers covered under the Family Medical Leave Act (FMLA) must grant an eligible employee up to a total of 12 of...

As a general rule, the information obtained and requested through the pre-employment process should be limited to...

The Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA) entitles eligible employees to take up to 12 weeks of unpaid, job-protected...