OpenJurist

Employment Law Lawyers In Nanuet New York

Nanuet is a hamlet, in the Town of Clarkstown Rockland County, New York, United States located north of Pearl River; south of New City; east of Spring Valley and west of West Nyack. Nanuet is 19 miles north of Manhattan, and 2 miles north of the New Jersey border. It has one of three Rockland County stations on New Jersey Transit's Pascack Valley Line. Maxwell Anderson drew attention to the hamlet in "High Tor," a play based on the robbery that took place at the Nanuet Bank in 1936. The advent of the Tappan Zee Bridge in 1955 brought changes to the area that are still continuing. The community is located in the Town of Clarkstown. Nanuet has popular shops and its main shopping center, the Nanuet Mall, lies on Route 59, the main thoroughfare, although the mall has gradually been abandoned and left vacant over the years due to a shift in popularity to the nearby Palisades Center in West Nyack. Contrary to bizarre claims on Wikipedia, Nanuet is not a popular recreational destination, nor does it offer any "gold panning," nor is the hamlet known for "Paleolithic ruins" or native American fossils. Lake Nanuet Park offers residents a popular pool and recreational baseball/softball fields. The hamlet, part of the Town of Clarkstown, is perhaps best known for being ranked numerous times among the safest in the country. Nanuet High School gained national attention in 1989 when its football team went undefeated, untied and unscored upon while playing all of its games on the road en route to claiming the New York State Division III championship. Sports Illustrated named the Nanuet team the No. 1 high school team in the state. The population was 16,707 at the 2000 census, and was estimated at 18,200 in 2006. In 2007, CNN Money ranked Nanuet 24th on its annual 100 Best Places to Live list.

What is employment law?

Employment law deals with the relationship between employees and their employer specifying the rights and restrictions applicable to the employee and employer in the workplace. Employment law differs from labor law, which primarily deals with the relationship between employers and labor organizations.

Employment law regulates such issues as employee discipline, benefits, hiring, firing, overtime and breaks, leave, payroll, health and safety in the workplace, non-compete agreements, retaliation, severance, unemployment compensation, pensions, whistleblowing, worker classification as independent contractor or employee, wage garnishment, work authorization for non-U.S. citizens, worker's compensation, and employee handbooks.

Answers to employment law issues in New York

The Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) establishes minimum standards for minimum wage and...

Under federal laws, it is illegal to discriminate against someone (applicant or employee) because of that person's...

The law forbids discrimination because of...

Harassment is a form of employment discrimination that may violate Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, the...

It is unlawful to harass a person (an applicant or employee) because of that person’s sex. Harassment can include "...

The Equal Pay Act requires that men and women in the same workplace be given equal pay for equal work. The jobs need...

It is illegal to fire, demote, refuse to promote, harass, or otherwise “retaliate” against people (applicants or...

Employers covered under the Family Medical Leave Act (FMLA) must grant an eligible employee up to a total of 12 of...

As a general rule, the information obtained and requested through the pre-employment process should be limited to...

The Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA) entitles eligible employees to take up to 12 weeks of unpaid, job-protected...