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Immigration Law Lawyers In Fenwick Island Delaware

Fenwick Island is a town in Sussex County, Delaware, United States. According to 2006 Census Bureau estimates, the population of the town is 357. It is part of the Seaford, Delaware Micropolitan Statistical Area. Fenwick Island, together with the towns of Lewes, Rehoboth Beach, Dewey Beach, Bethany Beach, and South Bethany, comprises Delaware's beach resort area and is Sussex County's most densely-populated and fastest-growing area. Fenwick Island and its neighbors to the north, Bethany Beach and South Bethany are popularly known as "The Quiet Resorts". This is in contradistinction to the wild atmosphere of Dewey Beach and the cosmopolitan bustle of Rehoboth Beach. Fenwick Island, however, is somewhat less "quiet" than "the Bethanies" because it is immediately across the state line from Ocean City, Maryland, which has a reputation as a lively vacation resort. Named after Thomas Fenwick, a planter from England who settled in Maryland, Fenwick Island lay in the part of Delaware which was claimed by Lord Baltimore and his heirs during the Penn-Baltimore border dispute. Contrary to popular belief, the town does not sit on a barrier island but on a narrow peninsula which resembles a barrier island (unless one considers a narrow man-made boat canal well inland that connects White Creek to Little Assawoman Bay). The narrow strip of land separates the Atlantic Ocean from Little Assawoman Bay. Ocean City, Maryland occupies the southern tip of this peninsula. Local legend has it that Cedar Island in Little Assawoman Bay was a spot for pirates to bury treasure. Regardless of the truth of the legend, the Delaware coastal area was well-known as a place for pirates to hide from the law. The town was an unincorporated area between South Bethany and Ocean City, Maryland until July 1953, when the Delaware General Assembly passed an act to incorporate the town. Local sentiment demanded incorporation to prevent the relentless high-rise development of Ocean City from creeping north into Fenwick Island.

What is immigration law?

Immigration law determines whether a person is an alien, the rights, duties, and obligations associated with being an alien in the United States, and how aliens gain residence or citizenship within the United States. It also provides the means by which certain aliens can become legally naturalized citizens with full rights of citizenship. Immigration law serves as a gatekeeper for the border of the nation, determining who may enter, how long they may stay, and when they must leave. Immigration lawyers represent persons seeking temporary and permanent residency (green cards) status in the U.S., those interested in obtaining U.S. citizenship through a process called naturalization, and clients facing deportation and removal. Immigration attorneys may also represent businesses seeking to secure temporary visa status for foreign employees.

Answers to immigration law issues in Delaware

The most commonly used non-immigrant visa by US employers, the H-1B classification applies to foreign nationals who...

In general, a foreign national who wishes to immigrate to the United States through family relationship must have a...

Foreign nationals desiring to enter the United States temporarily for the purpose of consulting with business...

L-1 intracompany transfer visas are available to foreign nationals coming to work in the US for an employer that is...

The E-1 or E-2 non-immigrant status is for a national of any of the countries with which the United States maintains...

The R-1 Religious Worker visa status is for foreign nationals who wish to be temporarily employed in the United...

The O-1 nonimmigrant visa is available to those foreign nationals who posses extraordinary ability in science,...

The North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) created special economic and trade relationships for the United...

U.S. Citizenship is obtained either by birth or naturalization. A foreign national may become a U.S. citizen either...

Employment Second Preference (EB-2)
Professionals Holding Advanced Degrees, or Persons of...

Federal court opinions concerning immigration law in Delaware