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Native Peoples Law Lawyers In Whitehouse New Jersey

Whitehouse is a village in Readington Township, New Jersey along the Jersey Turnpike, just west of Mechanicsville. In 1722, Abraham Van Horn purchased 490 acres in Readington along the Rockaway Creek. He built a grist mill and saw mill here. Around 1750, he built a white plastered wall tavern on the creek where the Jersey Turnpike crossed (this is now the corner of Washington Street and US 22). The tavern began to be referred to as the "White House" by travellers. The village, which sprang up to the east of the tavern also carried this name. Stones from the original tavern can be seen along the retaining wall of the DAR cemetery, where the tavern once stood. The village of White House stretched along the Jersey Turnpike (now Route 22 and Old Route 28), which was the main street. The village included taverns, stores, grist mills, an academy, a Dutch Reformed Church and numerous houses. The nearby Whitehouse Station, which also indirectly took the name from the tavern, was not built up until 1848 when an extension of the Somerville and Easton Railroad was built.

What is native peoples law?

Native Peoples Law is the area of law related to those peoples indigenous to the continent at the time of European colonization specifically Native Indians, Native Hawaiians, Alaska Natives and other native groups. Attorneys who practice native peoples law handle cases involving disputes related to the limited power of the federal government to regulate tribe property and activity, and cases involving unlawful discrimination against native peoples.

Answers to native peoples law issues in New Jersey

Gambling is subject to legislation at both the state and federal level that bans it from certain areas, limits the...

Federal court opinions concerning native peoples law in New Jersey