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Personal Injury Law Lawyers In Drytown California

Drytown (formerly, Dry Town) is an unincorporated community in Amador County, California. It is located 2.5 miles (4.0 km) south of Plymouth on Dry Creek, at an elevation of 646 feet. The current population is approximately 200. The town is registered as California Historical Landmark #31. The community is in ZIP code 95699 and area code 209. Drytown is the oldest community in Amador County, and the first in which gold was discovered. It took its name from Dry Creek, which runs dry during the summer. However, it was certainly not "dry", as stories tell of there being up to 26 saloons, of which just one remains, The Drytown Club. The gold started to peter out by 1857 and when a fire destroyed most of the town that year, most of its inhabitants packed up and moved to more successful mines elsewhere in the county. The town was only saved by the construction of State Route 49, which went through it, in 1920. A U.S. Post Office opened at Drytown in 1852. In the 1960's the post office was located within in the Drytown General Store operated by the Bruns family. A visit in January 2010 revealed That the general store building is now occupied by an antique shop, the Drytown Post Office is housed in an adjacent, newer building which is also an antique shop, and the Drytown general store is now in a second separate, newer building nearby. At the time of the January 2010 visit there was a sign on the door of the post office building stating that the post office was closed in April, 2009, and efforts were being made to reopen it. From 1959 to about 1968 -- before the Mother Lode tourist boom -- a summer theater company called the "Claypipers' staged comedic mellodramas with interspersed "olio" (song and dance) acts to mostly standing room only audiences. Musical accompanyment for both was provided by the incomparable Dottie Rodgers on the piano at stage left. The name Claypipers was taken from the clay pipes used by miners in the deep tunnels of hard rock gold mines -- not only for smoking, but also (it is rumored) to sneak nuggets out of the mines at the end of their shifts. After a wildly successful summer in adjacent Amador City, the Claypipers bought the century-old building across Highway 49 from the Drytown General Store and remodeled it into a theater with table seating, a bar, stage, wings and sophisticated (for the time) stage lighting system. The basement was converted to dressing rooms and green room, and a stairway added from there to the stage wings. The majority of the cast, crew and spectators traveled from communities around San Francisco Bay to this Mother Lode area on show days to be a part of this phenomenon. The large "Piper's Playhouse" marquee was a familiar sight to anyone traveling this part of Highway 49 during the Claypipers' tenure, now -- like the sound of the boisterous crowds cheering the heroes and booing the villians -- only a memory. The Claypipers also purchased the house across Spanish Street from the theater, constructed a "dorm" addition, and used it as a base of operations on show days and work days (mostly on weekends). Some time between 1968 and January 2010 -- after the Claypipers had sold their properties and disbanded -- a second story was added to what had been the Piper's Playhouse, and it has become another antique shop. The Claypipers also purchased a "fire engine" for Amador City -- a Red Ford 1-Ton pickup truck with builtin 400 gallon water tank and pump -- and constructed a "fire station" (garage) building to house it. In 1963, the volunteer Drytown Fire Department was called out three times, and saved two of the three houses involved. The third was fully engulfed in flames before the call came, but they were able to prevent the adjacent propane tank from erupting. In January 2010, the "fire engine" was no where to be found, and the "fire Station' building had been fitted with man-doors and had a 'For Rent' sign on it.

What is personal injury law?

Personal injury includes injuries to the body, mind or emotions, as opposed to an injury to property. If the negligence of another person can be proved, the person who is injured may be entitled to monetary compensation from that person who was negligent. Attorneys often represent clients on a contingency basis, in which the attorneys fee is a percentage of the compensation the plaintiff receives, payable when the case is resolved. Cases involving people who have suffered an injury for which someone else (an individual or business) may be legally liable -- may include injuries caused by car accidents, medical malpractice, dog bites, slip and fall incidents, and emotional distress.

Answers to personal injury law issues in California

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