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Railroad Worker Injury Law Lawyers In Cannonsburg Michigan

Cannonsburg is an unincorporated community within Cannon Township, Kent County in the U.S. state of Michigan. The community is on Bear Creek in the southwest part of the township at 43°03′14″N 85°28′11″W / 43.05389°N 85.46972°W / 43.05389; -85.46972. While the area was still a part of Plainfield Township, the settlement at Cannonsburg was founded in 1842 on an old Native American trail (Chippewa and Ottawa populated the area prior to the region being opened for white settlers). In 1844 and 1845, mills were erected by Edwin B. Bostwick, with H.T. Judson as architect. As an inducement to settlement, the community was platted in 1848 (or 1845 by some accounts). Bostwick, a business agent of railroad and steamboat financier LeGrand Cannon of Troy, New York, was instructed to give a lot to each resident who was not otherwise provided for. Twenty-five lots were given away and the town was named in honor of Cannon, who acknowledged the honor with the gift of a small cannon engraved with his name and the date. A local legend has it that the cannon was buried in a local swamp after misfiring and killing a young man. The first record of the township separate from Plainfield is on April 6, 1846. Mention is made that the Michigan Legislature had organized the town under the name of "Churchtown" in the spring of 1846 (or 1845 in some sources). The name was soon after changed to Cannon, after the largest settlement. A post office was established on May 7, 1844, with the spelling as "Cannonsburgh". The spelling was changed to Cannonsburg on February 5, 1894. The Cannonsburg ZIP code 49317 provides P.O. Box only service. Cannonsburg continued to be at the center of township business through the end of the 20th Century when the township offices were moved to a new location 2 miles to the north, along the M-44 corridor.

What is railroad worker injury law?

Railroad worker injuries are covered under the Federal Employees Liability Act which requires that a railroad maintains their fleet, ensuring that their trains are in good working order and free of defects. If a railroad does not comply with these standards, they may be liable for injuries to their workers. Damages railroad workers may receive include medical treatments, present and future lost wages and mental trauma. An injury on the railway can range from a minor sprain to a spinal injury so severe that it leads to death. Some of the most common injuries that affect railway workers are head trauma, knee injuries, back injuries, neck injuries, carpal tunnel syndrome, brain trauma or spinal cord injuries. The Federal Employees Liability Act protects railroad workers and others as diverse as clerical employees whose day-to-day functions do not directly involve trains or outdoor activity.

Answers to railroad worker injury law issues in Michigan

In certain kinds of cases, lawyers charge what is called a contingency fee. Instead of billing by the hour, the...

Train accident injuries are not limited to catastrophic events such as train collisions. Trains are federally...