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Railroad Worker Injury Law Lawyers In Copper Harbor Michigan

Copper Harbor is a small, unincorporated community in northeastern Keweenaw County in the U.S. state of Michigan. It is within Grant Township on the Keweenaw Peninsula that juts from the Upper Peninsula of Michigan into Lake Superior. The town's name alludes to the former use of its harbor as a port for shipping copper mined from local deposits during the mid-19th century. That economic activity no longer exists, and the town's harbor is most used for recreational use such as snowmobiling and for a ferry that connects Isle Royale National Park to northern Michigan. The town is in an area of spectacular scenery; it is the northern terminus of US 41 and the eastern terminus of M-26. Both approaches to Copper Harbor, the shore-hugging M-26 from Eagle Harbor and the more inland, rugged US 41 offer dramatic views, as does the Brockway Mountain Drive overlook. Nearby is Fort Wilkins Historic State Park, a restored 1844 frontier army base originally built to protect the port in the early years of the copper mining boom. Also, one can follow Manganese Road from the town's center to Manganese Falls and the Estivant Pines, among the oldest and tallest remaining strands of virgin white pines located in Michigan. The Copper Harbor Lighthouse is situated at the opening of the harbor. Copper Harbor is at 47°28′08″N 87°53′18″W / 47.4687939°N 87.8884416°W / 47.4687939; -87.8884416Coordinates: 47°28′08″N 87°53′18″W / 47.4687939°N 87.8884416°W / 47.4687939; -87.8884416. The ZIP code is 49918 and the FIPS place code is 18100.

What is railroad worker injury law?

Railroad worker injuries are covered under the Federal Employees Liability Act which requires that a railroad maintains their fleet, ensuring that their trains are in good working order and free of defects. If a railroad does not comply with these standards, they may be liable for injuries to their workers. Damages railroad workers may receive include medical treatments, present and future lost wages and mental trauma. An injury on the railway can range from a minor sprain to a spinal injury so severe that it leads to death. Some of the most common injuries that affect railway workers are head trauma, knee injuries, back injuries, neck injuries, carpal tunnel syndrome, brain trauma or spinal cord injuries. The Federal Employees Liability Act protects railroad workers and others as diverse as clerical employees whose day-to-day functions do not directly involve trains or outdoor activity.

Answers to railroad worker injury law issues in Michigan

In certain kinds of cases, lawyers charge what is called a contingency fee. Instead of billing by the hour, the...

Train accident injuries are not limited to catastrophic events such as train collisions. Trains are federally...

Federal court opinions concerning railroad worker injury law in Michigan