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Toxic Tort Law Lawyers In Miranda California

Miranda (formerly, Jacobsen's) is an unincorporated community in Humboldt County, California. It is located 2.5 miles (4 km) northwest of Phillipsville, at an elevation of 351 feet (107 m). The ZIP Code is 95553. The town was named by a former postmistress and is within a five minute walk of the south fork of the Eel River, amidst giant redwood trees. Miranda is on the Avenue of the Giants between Myers Flat to the north and Phillipsville to the south. The post office was opened on August 26th, 1905. It is unclear when exactly it became a settlement prior to that, though older residents will tell you the earliest they can remember is their folks coming up from San Francisco during the California Gold Rush era of the 1840s and '50s. Besides the post office, the town boasts one restaurant, a combination motel, market, and gas station (all owned by one family), a Seventh-day Adventist church, a Latter-Day Saints Church, a small, rural high school encompassing grades 8-12, a Community Grange, two gift shops, and an active Volunteer Fire Department. There is a glass gallery one mile south of Miranda on the Avenue of the Giants in the historical unincorporated area formerly known as Firhaven. South Fork High School is the only regular high school of Southern Humboldt Unified School District. The school's name refers to the South Fork of the Eel River. Osprey Learning Center, an alternative continuation high school, is located across the football field from SFHS in facilities that formerly housed the now-defunct Miranda Junior High School. The ZIP Code is 95553. The community is inside Area code 707. Elevation is said to be 351 feet at the town sign, though the terrain is generally not flat and encompasses sea level to over 2,000-foot elevations. Miranda is in the PST zone and observes Daylight Savings.

What is toxic tort law?

Toxic Tort cases involve people who have been injured through exposure to dangerous pharmaceuticals or chemical substances in the environment, on the job, or in consumer products -- including carcinogenic agents, lead, benzene, silica, harmful solvents, hazardous waste, and pesticides to name a few.

Most toxic tort cases have arisen either from exposure to pharmaceutical drugs or occupational exposures. Most pharmaceutical toxic injury cases are mass tort cases, because drugs are consumed by thousands of people, many of whom become ill from a toxic drug. There have also been many occupational toxic tort cases, because industrial and other workers are often chronically exposed to toxic chemicals - more so than consumers and residents. Most of the law in this area arises from asbestos exposure, but thousands of toxic chemicals are used in industry and workers in these areas can experience a variety of toxic injuries. Unlike the general population, which is exposed to trace amounts of thousands of different chemicals in the environment, industrial workers are regularly exposed to much higher levels of chemicals and therefore have a greater risk of developing disease from particular chemical exposures than the general population. The home has recently become the subject of toxic tort litigation, mostly due to mold contamination, but also due to construction materials such as formaldehyde-treated wood and carpet. Toxic tort cases also arise when people are exposed to consumer products such as pesticides and suffer injury. Lastly, people can also be injured from environmental toxins in the air or in drinking water.

Answers to toxic tort law issues in California

In certain kinds of cases, lawyers charge what is called a contingency fee. Instead of billing by the hour, the...

Because of the health problems caused by lead poisoning, the federal Residential Lead-Based Paint Hazard Reduction...

Property owners may be liable for tenant health problems caused by exposure to environmental hazards, such as...

In general, mass tort cases involve a large number of individual claimants with claims associated with a single...

Federal court opinions concerning toxic tort law in California