Definitions from Black's Law Dictionary: 2nd Edition and Ballentine's Law Dictionary as are available for each term in each dictionary.
  • Ballentine's Law Dictionary

    Tie between a husband and the blood relations of the wife, and between a wife and the blood relations of the husband but not between the blood relations of either and those of the other. See 6 L. R. A. 713; also 79 Am. St. Rep. 195.

  • Black's Law Dictionary: 2nd Edition

    At common law. Relationship by marriage between the husband and the blood relations of the wife, and between the wife and the blood relations of the husband. 1 Bl. Comm. 434; Solinger v. Earle, 45 N. Y. Super. Ct. 80; Tegarden v. Phillips (Ind. App.) 39 N. E. 212. Affinity is distinguished into three kinds:
    (1) Direct, or that subsisting between the husband and his wife's relations by blood, or between the wife and the husband's relations by blood ;
    (2) secondary, or that which subsists between the husband and his wife's relations by marriage ,
    (3) collateral, or that which subsists between the husband and the relations of his wife's relations. Wharton. In the civil law. The connection which arises by marriage between each person of the married pair and the kindred of the other. Mackeld. Rom. Law, § 147; Poy-dras v. Livingston, 5 Mart. O. S. (La.) 295. A husband is related by affinity to all the consanguinei of his wife, and vice versa, the wife to the husband's consanguinei; for the husband and wife being considered one flesh, those who are related to the one by blood are related to the other by affinity. Gib. Cod. 412; 1 Bl. Comm. 435. In a larger sense, consanguinity or kindred. Co. Litt. 157a.
    —Quasi affinity. In the civil law. The affinity which exists between two persons, one of whom has been betrothed to a kinsman of the other, but who have never been married;