Definitions from Black's Law Dictionary: 2nd Edition and Ballentine's Law Dictionary as are available for each term in each dictionary.
  • Ballentine's Law Dictionary

    Goods; chattels; property.

  • Black's Law Dictionary: 2nd Edition

    Lat n. Goods; property; possessions. In the Roman law, this term was used to designate all species of property, real, personal, and mixed, but was more strictly applied to real estate. In modern civil law, it includes both personal property (technically so called) and chattels real, thus corresponding to the French biens. In the common law, its use was confined to the description of movable goods. Tisdale v. Harris, 20 Pick, (Mass.) 13; Penniman v. French, 17 Pick. (Mass.) 404, 28 Am. Dee, 309.
    —Bona confiscata. Goods confiscated or forfeited to the imperial fisc or treasury. 1 Bl. Comm. 299.
    —Bona et catalla. Goods and cbattels. Movable property. This expression includes all personal things tbat belong to a man. 16 Mees. & W. 68.
    —Bona felonum. In English law. Goods of felons ; the goods of one convicted of felony. 5 Coke, 110.
    —Bona for-isfacta. Goods forfeited.
    —Bona fugitivorum. In English law. Goods of fugitives ; the proper goods of him who flies for felony. 5 Coke, 1096.
    —Bona mobilia. In the civil law. Movables. Those things which move themselves or can be transported from one place to another, and not permanently attached to a farm, heritage, or building.
    —Bona notabilia. In English probate law. Notable goods; property worthy of notice, or of sufficient value to be accounted for, that is, amounting to £5. Where a decedent leaves goods of sufficient amount (bona notabilia) in different dioceses, administration is granted by the metropolitan, to prevent the confusion arising from the appointment of many different administrators. 2 Bl. Comm. 509; Rolls, Abr. 908. Moore v. Jordan, 36 Kan. 271, 13 Pac. 337, 59 Am. Rep. 550.
    —Bona paraphernalia. In the civil law. The separate property of a married woman other than that which is included in her dowry; more particularly, her clothing, jewels, and ornaments. Whi-ton v. Snyder, 88 N. Y. 303.
    —Bona peritura. Goods of a perishable nature; such goods as an executor or trustee must use diligence in disposing of and converting them into money.
    —Bona ntlagatorum. Goods of outlaws; goods belonging to persons outlawed.
    —Bona vacantia. Vacant, unclaimed, or stray goods. Those things in which nobody claims a property, and which belong to the crown, by virtue of its prerogative. 1 Bl. Comm. 298.
    —Bona waviata. In English law. Waived goods; goods stolen and waived, that is, thrown away by the thief in his flight, for fear of being apprehended, or to facilitate his escape; and which go to the sovereign. 5 Coke, 109b; 1 Bl. Comm. 296.

  • Black's Law Dictionary: 2nd Edition

    Lat. adj. Good. Used in numerous legal phrases of which the following are the principal:
    —Bona fides. Good fnith; integrity of dealing; honesty; sincerity; the opposite of mala fides and of dolus malus.
    —'Bonn gestura. Good abearance or behavior.
    —Bona gratia. In the Roman law. By mutual consent; voluntarily. A term applied to a species of divorce where the parties separated by mutual consent; or where the parlies renounced their marital engagements without assigning any cause, or upon mere pretexts. Tayl. Civil Law, 361, 362: Calvin.
    —Bona memoria. Good memory. Generally used in the phrase sanos mentis et bonce memories, of sound mind and good memory, as descriptive of the mental capacity of a testator.
    —Bona patria. In the Scotch law. An assize or jury of good neighbors. Bell.