Definitions from Black's Law Dictionary: 2nd Edition and Ballentine's Law Dictionary as are available for each term in each dictionary.
  • Ballentine's Law Dictionary

    A notice of a meeting; a stock assessment; a monumenti, landmark, course or distance in a survey. See 1 Wash. St. 521, 20 Pac. 605.

  • Black's Law Dictionary: 2nd Edition

    n. 1. In English law. The election of students to the degree of barrister at law, hence the coremony or epoch of election, and the number of persens elected. 2. In conveyancing. A visible natural object or landmark designated in a patent, entry, grant, or other conveyance of lands, as a limit or boimdary to the land described, with which the points of surveying must correspond. Also the courses and distances designated. King v. Watkins (C. C.) 98 Fed. 922; Stockton v. Morris, 39 W. Va. 432, 19 S. El 531. 3. In corporation law. A demand made by the directors of a stock company upon the persons who have subscribsd for shares, requiring a certain portion or installment of the amount subscribed to be paid in. The word, in this sense, in synonymous with "assessment," (q. v.) A call is an assessment on shares of stock, usually for unpaid installments of the subscription thereto. The word is said to be capable of thrce meanings:
    (1) The resolution of the directors to levy the assessment;
    (2) its notification to the persens liable to pay;
    (3) the time when it becomes payable. Railway Co. v. Mitchell, 4 Exch. 543; Hatch v. Dana, 101 U. S. 205, 25 L. Ed. 885; Rallroad Ch v. Spreckles, 65 Cal. 193, 3 Pac. 661, 802; Stewart v. Pub. Co., 1 Wash. St. 521, 20 Pac. 605. 4. In the language of the stock exchange, a "call" is an option to claim stock at a fixed price on a certain day. White v. Treat (C. Ct) 100 Fed. 290; Lumber Co., v. Whitebreast Coal Co., 160 111. 85, 43 N. E. 774, 31 In R. A. 529.

  • Black's Law Dictionary: 2nd Edition

    v. To summon or demand by name; to demand the presence and participation of a number of persons by calling aloud their names, either in a pre-arranged and systematic order or in a succession determined by chance.
    —Call of the house. A call of the names of all the members of a legislative body, made by the clerk in pursuance of a resolution requiring the attendance of members. The names of absentees being thus ascertnined, they are imperatively summoned (and, if necessary, compelled) to attend the session.
    —Calling a summons. In Scotch practice. See this described in Bell, Diet.
    —Calling the docket. The public calling of the docket or list of causes at the commencement of a term of court, for the purpose of disposing of the same with regard to setting a time for trial or entering orders of continuance, default, nonsuit, etc. Blanchard v. Ferdinand, 132 Mass. 391.
    —Calling the jury. Successively drawing out of a box into which they have been previously put the names of the jurors on the panels annexed to the nisi prius record, and calling them over in the order in which they are so drawn. The twelve persons whose names are first cniled, and who appear, are sworn as the jury, unless some just cause of challenge or excuse, with respect to any of them, shall be brought forward.
    —Calling the plaintiff. In practice. A formal method of causing a nonsuit to be entered. When a plaintiff or his counsel, seeing that sufficient evidence has not been given to maintain the issue, withdraws. the crier is ordered to call or demand the plaintiff, and if neither he, nor any person for him appear, he is nonsuited, the jurors are discharged without giving a verdict, the action is at an end, and the defendant recovers his costs.
    —Calling to the bar. In English practice. Conferring the dignity or degree of barrister at law upon a member of one of the inns of court. Holthouse
    —Calling upon a prisoner. When a prisoner has been found guilty on an indictment, the clerk of the court addresses him and calls upon him to say why judgment should not be passed upon him.