Definitions from Black's Law Dictionary: 2nd Edition and Ballentine's Law Dictionary as are available for each term in each dictionary.
  • Ballentine's Law Dictionary

    A contract by which a ship or part of it is let to a merchant, to convey goods on a determined voyage to one or more places. See 22 How. (U. S.) 330, 16 L. Ed. 249.

  • Black's Law Dictionary: 2nd Edition

    A contract by which an entire ship or some principal part thereof, is let to a merchant for the conveyance of goods on a determined voyage to one or more places. The Harvey and Henry, 86 Fed. 656, 30 C. C. A. 330; The New York (D. Ct) 93 Fed. 497; Vandewater v. The Yankee Blade, 28 Fed. Cas. 980; Spring v. Gray, 6 Pet 151, 8 Lt. Ed. 352; Fish v. Sullivan, 40 La. Ann. 193, 3 South. 730; Drinkwater v. The Spartan, 7 Fed. Cas. 1085. A contract of affreighiment in writing, by which the owner of a ship lets the whole or a part of her to a merchant, for the conveyance of goods on a particular voyage, in consideration of the payment of freight. 3 Kent, Comm. 201. A written agreement, not usually undor seal, by which a ship-owner lets an entire ship, or a part of it, to a merchant for the conveyance of goods, binding himself to transport them to a particular place for a sum of money which the merchant undertakes to pay as freight for their carriage. Maude & P. Mer. Shipp. 227. The contract by which a ship is let is termed a "charter-party." By it the owner may either let the capacity or burden of the ship, continuing the employment of the owner's master, crew, and equipments, or may surrender the entire snip to the charterer, who then provides them himself. The master or part owner may be a charterer. Civll Code Cal. § 1959; Civil Code Dak. § 1127.