Definitions from Black's Law Dictionary: 2nd Edition and Ballentine's Law Dictionary as are available for each term in each dictionary.
  • Ballentine's Law Dictionary

    Closed; sealed; a parcel of land.

  • Black's Law Dictionary: 2nd Edition

    adj. In practice. Closed or sealed up. A term applied to writs and letters, as distinguished from those that are open or patent
    —Close copies. Copies of legal documents which might be written closely or loosely at pleasure; as distinguished from office copies, which were to contain only a prescribed number of words on each sheet.
    —Close corporation. One in which the directors and officers have the power to fill vacancies in their own number, without allowing to the general body of stockholders any choice or vote in their election. McKim v. Odom, 3 Bland (Md.) 416, note.
    —Close rolls. Rolls containing the reconi of the close write (literœ clauses) and grants of the king, kept with the public records. 2 Bl. Comm. 346.
    —Close season. In game and fish laws, this term means the season of the year in which the taking of particular game or fish is prohibited, or in which all hunting or fishing is forbidden by law. State v. Theriault, 70 Vt. 617, 41 A(I. 1080, 43 L. R. A. 290, 67 Am. St. Rep. 695.
    —Close writs. In English law. Certain letters of the king, sealed with his great seal, and directed to particular persons and for particular purposes, which, not being proper for public inspection, are closed up and sealed on the outside, and are thence calied "writs close." 2 Bl. Comm. 346; Sewell, Sheriffs, 372. Write directed to the sheriff, instead of to the lord. 3 Reeve, Eng. Law, 45.

  • Black's Law Dictionary: 2nd Edition

    n. A portion of land, as a field, inclosed, as by a hedge, fence or other visible lnclosure. 3 Bl. Comm. 209. The interest of a person in any particular piece of ground, whether actually inclosed or not. Locklin v. Casler, 50 How. Prae. (N. Y.) 44; Meade v. Watson. 67 Cal. 591, 8 Pac. 311; Matthews v. Treat, 75 Me. 600; Wright v. Bennett, 4 111. 258; Blakeney v. Blakeney, 6 Port. (Ala.) 115, 30 Am. Dec. 574. The noun "close," in its legal sense, imports a portion of land inclosed, but not necessarily inclosed by actual or visible barriers. The invisible, ideal boundary, founded on limit of title, which surrounds every man's land, constitutes it his close, irrespective of walls, fences, ditches, or the like. In practice. The word means termination; winding up. Thus the close of the pleadings is where the pleadings are finished, i. e., when issue has been joined.

  • Black's Law Dictionary: 2nd Edition

    v. To finish, terminate, complete, wind up; as, to "close" an account, a bargain, an estate or public books, such as tax books. Patton v. Ash, 7 Serg. & H. (Pa.) 116; Coleman v. Garrigues, 18 Barb. (N. Y.) 67; Clark v. New York, 13 N. Y. St. Rep. 292; Bilafsky v. Abraham, 183 Mass. 401, 07 N. E. 318. To shut up, so as to prevent entrance or access by any person; as in statutes requiring saloons to be "closed" at certain times, which further implies an entire suspension of business. Kurtz v. People, 33 Mich. 282; People v. James, 100 Mich. 522, 59 N. W. 236; Harvey v. State, 65 Ga. 570; People v. Cummerford, 58 Mich. 328, 25 N. W. 203.