Definitions from Black's Law Dictionary: 2nd Edition and Ballentine's Law Dictionary as are available for each term in each dictionary.
  • Ballentine's Law Dictionary

    A place reserved for a prisoner on trial; the space between two wharves. See 58 U. S. 426, 15 L. Ed. 118.

  • Black's Law Dictionary: 2nd Edition

    n. The cage or inclosed space in a criminal court where prisoners stand when brought in for trial. The space, in a river or harbor, Inclosed between two wharves. City of Boston v. Lecraw, 17 How. 434, 15 L. Ed. 118; Bingham v. Doane, 9 Ohio, 107. "A dock is an artificial basin in connection with a harbor, used for the reception of vessels in the taking on or discharging of their cargoes, and provided with gates for preventing the rise and fall of the waters occasioned by the tides, and keeping a uniform level within the docks." Perry v. Haines, 191 U. S. 17, 24 Sup. Ct. 8, 48 In Ed. 73.
    —Dockage. A charge against vessels for the privilege of mooring to the wharves or in the slips. People v. Roberts, 92 Cal. 659, 28 Pac. 689. A pecuniary compensation for the use of a dock while a vessel is undergoing repairs. Ives v. The Buckeye State, 13 Fed Cas. i84.
    —Dock-master. An officer invested with powers within the docks, and a certam distance therefrom, to direct the mooring and removing of ships, so as to prevent obstruction to the dock entrances. Mozley & Whitley.
    — Dock warrant. In English law. A warrant given by dock-owners to the owner of merchandise imported and warehoused on the dock, upon the faith of the bills of lading, as a recognition of his title to the goods. It is a negotiable instrument. Pull. Port of London, p. 375.

  • Black's Law Dictionary: 2nd Edition

    v. To curtail or diminish, as to dock an entail.