Definitions from Black's Law Dictionary: 2nd Edition and Ballentine's Law Dictionary as are available for each term in each dictionary.
  • Ballentine's Law Dictionary

    Internal, as opposed to foreign; a house servant.

  • Black's Law Dictionary: 2nd Edition

    adj. Pertaining, belonging or relating to a home, a domicile or to the place of birth, origin, creation or transaction.
    —Domestic animals. Such as are habituated to live in or about the habitations of men, or such as contribute to the support of a family or the wealth of the community. This term includes horses, (State v. Gould, 26 W. Va. 264; Osborn v. Lenox, 2 Alien [Mass.] 207,) but may or may not include dogs. See Wilcox v. State, 101 Ga. 593, 28 S. E. 981, 39 L. R. A. 709; State v. Harriman, 75 Me. 562, 46 Am. Rep. 423 ; Hurley v. State, 30 Tex. App. 333, 17 S. W. 455, 28 Am. St. Rep. 916.
    —Domestic courts. Those existing and having jurisdiction at the place of the party's residence or domicile. Dickinson v. Rnilroad Co., 7 W. Va. 417. As to domestic "Administrators," "Attachment," "Bill of Exchange," "Commerce," "Corporations," "Creditors," "Factors," "Fixtures," "Judgment," and "Manufactures," see those titles.

  • Black's Law Dictionary: 2nd Edition

    n. Domestica, or, In full, domestic servants, are servants who reside in the same house with the master they serve. The term does not extend to workmen or laborers employed out of doors. Ex parte Mcason, 5 Bin. (Pat) 167. The Louisiana Civil Co.de enumerates as domestics those who receive wages and stay in the house of the person paying and employing them, for his own service or that of his family; such as valets, footmen, cooks, butlers, and others who reside in the house. Persons employed in public houses are not included. Cook v. Dodge, 6 La. Ann. 276.