Definitions from Black's Law Dictionary: 2nd Edition and Ballentine's Law Dictionary as are available for each term in each dictionary.
  • Ballentine's Law Dictionary

    Same as Essoign.

  • Black's Law Dictionary: 2nd Edition

    n. In old English law. An excuse for not appearing in court at the return of the process. Presentation of such excuse. Spelman; 1 Sel. Pr. 4; Com. Dig. "Exoine," B 1. Essoin is not now allowed at all In personal actions. 2 Term, 16; 16 East, 7o; 3 Bl. Comm. 278, note.
    —Essoin day. Formerly the first general return-day of the term, on which the courts sat to receive essoins, i. e., excuses for parties who did not appear in court, according to the summons of write. 3 Bl. Comm. 278; Boote, Suit at Law, 130; Gills Com. Pi. 13; 1 Tidd, Pr. 107. But, by St 11 Geo. IV. and 1 Wm. IV. c. 70, § 6, these days were done away with, as a part of the term.
    —Essoin de malo villæ is when the defendant is in court the first day ; but gone without pleading, and being afterwards surprised by sickness, etc., cannot attend, but sends two essoiners, who openly protest in court that he is detained by sickness in such a village, that he cannot come pro luorari and pro perdere; and this will be admitted, for it Iieth on the plaintiff to prove whether the essoin is true or not. Jacob.
    —Essoin roll. A roil upon which essoins were formerly entered, together with the day to which they were adjourned. Boote, Snit at Law, 130; Rose. Real Act 162, 163 ; Gilb. Com. PI. 13.

  • Black's Law Dictionary: 2nd Edition

    v. In old English practice. To present or offer an excuse for not appearing in court on an appointed day in obedience to a summons; to cast an essoin. Spelman. This was anciently done by a person whom the party sent for that purpose, called an "essoiner."