Definitions from Black's Law Dictionary: 2nd Edition and Ballentine's Law Dictionary as are available for each term in each dictionary.
  • Ballentine's Law Dictionary

    Obtaining property from another without his consent, induced by a wrongful use of force or fear, or under color of official right. See 93 Cal. 452, 27 Am. St. Rep. 207, 28 Pac. 1068. See, also, 96 Am. Dec. 193, note.

  • Black's Law Dictionary: 2nd Edition

    Any oppression by color or pretense of right, and particularly the exaction by an officer of money, by color of his office, either when none at all is due or not so much is due or when it is not yet due. Preston v. Bacon, 4 Conn. 480. Extortion consists in any publlc officer unlawfully taking, by color of hls office, from any person any money or thing of value that is not due to him, or more than his due. Code Ga. 1882, § 4507. Extortion is the obtaining of property from another, with his consent, induced by wrongful use of force or fear, or under color of official right. Pen. Code Cal. § 518; Pen. Co.de Dak. § 608. And see Cohen v. State, 37 Tex. Cr. R. 118, 38 S. W. 1005; ,U. S. v Dcaver (D. C.) 14 Fed. 507; People v. Hoffman, 126 Cal. 366, 58 Pac. 856; State v. I Logan, 104 La. 760, 29 South. 336; Pcople v. Barondess, 61 Hun, 571, 16 N. Y. Supp. 436 Extortion is an abuse of public justice; which consists in any officer unlawfuly taking, by color of his office, from any man any money or thing of value that is not due to him, or bsfore it is due. 4 Bl. Comm. 141. Extortion is any oppression under color of right In a stricter sense, the taking of money by any officer, by color of his office, when none, or not so much, is due, or it is not yet due. 1 Hawk. P. C. (Curw. Ed.) 418. It is the corrupt demanding or receiving by a person in office of a fee for services which should be performed grafuitously; or, where compensation is permissible, of a larger fee than the law justifies, or a fee not due. 2 Bish. Crim. Law, § 390. The distinction between "bribery" and "extortion" seems to be this: the former offense consists in the offering a present, or receiving one, if offered; the latter, in demanding a fee or present, by color of office. Jacob. For the distinction between "extortion" and "exaction," see Exaction.