Definitions from Black's Law Dictionary: 2nd Edition and Ballentine's Law Dictionary as are available for each term in each dictionary.
  • Ballentine's Law Dictionary

    To deliver and leave with the proper officer the instrument to be filed (See 77 Wis. 136, 20 Am. St. Rep. 102, 45 N. W. 953); a collection of filed papers; a girl; a daughter.

  • Black's Law Dictionary: 2nd Edition

    n. A thread, string or wire upon which writs and other exhibits in courts and offices are fastened or filed for the more safe-keeping and ready turning to the same. Spelman ; Cowell; Tomlins. Papers put together and tied in bundles. A paper is said also to be filed when it ls delivered to the proper officer, and by him received to be kept on fils. 13 Vin. Abr. 211; 1 Litt. 113; 1 Hawk. P. C. 7, 207; Phillips v. Beene, 38 Ala. 251; Holman v. Chevaillier, 14 Tex. 338; Beebe v. Morrell, 76 Mich. 114, 42 N. W. 1119, 15 Am. St. Rep. 288. But, in general, "file," or "the files," is used loosely to denote the official custody of the court or the place in the offices of a court where the records and papers are kept.

  • Black's Law Dictionary: 2nd Edition

    v. In practice. To put upon the files or deposit in the custody or among the records of a court. "Filing a bill" in equity is an equivalent expression to "commencing a suit." "To file" a paper, on the part of a party, is to place it in the official custody of the clerk. "To file," on the part of the clerk, is to indorse upon the paper the date of its reception, and retain it in his office, subject to inspection by whomsoever it may concern. Holman v. Chevaillier, 14 Tex. 339. The expressions "filing" and "entering of record" are not synonymous. They are nowhere so used, but always convey distinct ideas. "Filing" originally signified placing papers in order on a thread or wire for safe-keeping. In this country and at this day it means, agreeably to our practice, depositing them in due order in the proper office. Entering of record uniformly implies writing. Naylor v. Moody, 2 Blackf. (Ind.) 247.