Definitions from Black's Law Dictionary: 2nd Edition and Ballentine's Law Dictionary as are available for each term in each dictionary.
  • Ballentine's Law Dictionary

    A sum adjudged to be paid as a punishment for crime; to sentence to pay a fine; a fine of lands, which see.

  • Black's Law Dictionary: 2nd Edition

    n. In conveyancing. An amicable composition or agreement of a suit, either actual or fictitious, by leave of the court, by which the lauds in question become, or are acknowledged to toe, the right of one of the parties. 2 BL Comm. 349; Christy v. Burch, 25 Fla. 942, 2 South. 258; First Nat. Bank v. Roberts, 9 Mont. 323, 23 Pac. 718; Hitz v. Jenks, 123 U. S. 297, 8 Sup. Ct. 148, 31 L. Ed. 156; McGregor v. Comstock, 17 N. Y. 166. Fines were abolished in England by St. 3 & 4 Wm. IV. c. 74, substituting a disentailing deed, (q. v.) The party who parted with the land, by acknowledging the right of the other, was said to levy the fine, and was called the "cognizor" or "conusor," while the party who recovered or received the estate was termed the "cognizee" or "conusee," and the fine was said to be levied to him. In the law of tenure. A fine is a money payment made by a feudal tenant to his lord. The most usual fine is that payable on the admittance of a new tenant, but there are also due in some manors fines upon alienation, on a license to demise the lands, or on the death of the lord, or other events. Elton, Copyh. 159; De Peyster v. Michael, 6 N. Y. 495, 57 Am. Dec. 470.
    —Executed fine, see .Executed.
    —Fine and recovery act. The English statutes 3 & 4 Wm. IV. c. 74, for abolishing fines and recoveries. 1 Steph. Comm. 514, et seq.
    —Fine for alienation. A fine anciently payable upon the alienation of a feudal estate and substitution of a new tenant. It was payable to the lord by all tenants holding by knight's service or tenants in capite by socage tenure. Abolished by 12 Car. II. c. 24. See 2 Bl. Comm. 71, 89.
    —Fine for endowment. A fine anciently payable to the lord by the widow of a tenant, without which she could not be endowed of her husband's lands. Abolished under Henry I., and by Magna Charta. 2 Bl. Comm. 135; Mozley & Whitley.
    —Fine sur cognisance de droit come ceo que il ad de son done. A fine upon acknowledgment of the right of the cognizee as that which he hath of the gift of the cognizor. By this the deforciant acknowledged in court a former foeffment or gift in possession to have been made by him to the plaintiff. 2 Bl. Comm. 352.
    —Fine sur cognizance de droit tantnm. A fine upon acknowledgment of the right merely, and not with the circumstance of a preceding gift from the cognizor. This was commonly used to pass a reversionary interest which was in the cognizor, of which there could be no foeffment supposed. 2 Bl. Comm. 353; 1 Steph. Comm. 519.
    —Fine sur concessit. A fine upon concessit, (he hath granted.) A species of fine, where the cognizor, in order to make an end of disputes, though he acknowledged no precedent right, yet granted to the cognizee an estate de novo, usually for life or years, by way of supposed composition. 2 Bl. Comm. 353; 1 Steph.'Comm. 519.
    —Fine sur done grant et render. A double fine, comprehending the fine sur cognizance de droit come ceo and the fine sur concessit. It might be used to convey particular limitations of estates, whereas the fine sur cognizance de dfroit come ceo, etc., conveyed nothing but an absolute estate, either of inheritance, or at least freehold. In this last species of fines, the cognizee, after the right was acknowledged to be in him, granted back again or rendered to the cognizor, or perhaps to a stranger, some other estate in the premises. 2 Bl. Comm. 353. In criminal law. Pecuniary punishment imposed by a lawful tribunal upon a person convicted of crime or misdemeanor. Lancaster v. Richardson, 4 Lans. —Joint fine. In old English law. "If a whole vill is to be fined, a joint fine may be laid, and it will be good for the necessity of it; but, in other cases, fines for offenses are to be severally imposed on each particular offender, and not jointly upon all of them." Jacob.

  • Black's Law Dictionary: 2nd Edition

    v. To impose a pecuniary punishment or mulct To sentence a person convicted of an offense to pay a penalty in money. Goodman v. Durant B. & L. Ass'n, 71 Miss. 310, 14 South. 146; State v. Belle, 92 Iowa, 258, 60 N. W. 525.