Definitions from Black's Law Dictionary: 2nd Edition and Ballentine's Law Dictionary as are available for each term in each dictionary.
  • Ballentine's Law Dictionary

    A bay forming sheltered mooring for ships. See 51 Conn. 266, 50 Am. Rep. 16. See, also, Harboring.

  • Black's Law Dictionary: 2nd Edition

    n. A haven or a space of deep water so sheltered by the adjacent land as to afford a safe anchorage for ships. Rowe v. Smith, 51 Conn. 271, 50 Am. Rep. 16; The Aurania (D. C.) 29 Fed. 103 ; People v. Klrsch, 67 Mich. 539, 35 N. W. 157. "Port" is a word of larger import than "harbor," since it implies the presence of wharves, or at any rate the means and opportunity of receiving and discharging cargo.
    —Harbor authority. In England a harbor authority is a body of persons, corporate or unincorporate, being proprietors of, or intrusted with the duty of constructing, improving, managing, or lighting, any harbor. St. 24 & 25 Viet. c. 47.
    —Harbor line, A line marking the boundary of a certain part of a public water which is reserved for a harbor. Engs v. Peckham, 11 R. I. 224.

  • Black's Law Dictionary: 2nd Edition

    v. To receive clandestinely and without lawful authority a person for the purpose of so concealing him that another having a right to the lawful custody of such person shall be deprived of the same. Jones v. Van Zandt, 5 How. 215, 227, 12 L. Ed. 122. A distinction has been taken, in some decisions, between "harbor" and "conceal." A person may be convicted of harboring a slave, although he may not have concealed her. McElhaney v. State, 24 Ala. 7L