Cannonsburg is an unincorporated community within Cannon Township, Kent County in the U.S. state of Michigan. The community is on Bear Creek in the southwest part of the township at 43°03′14″N 85°28′11″W / 43.05389°N 85.46972°W / 43.05389; -85.46972. While the area was still a part of Plainfield Township, the settlement at Cannonsburg was founded in 1842 on an old Native American trail (Chippewa and Ottawa populated the area prior to the region being opened for white settlers). In 1844 and 1845, mills were erected by Edwin B. Bostwick, with H.T. Judson as architect. As an inducement to settlement, the community was platted in 1848 (or 1845 by some accounts). Bostwick, a business agent of railroad and steamboat financier LeGrand Cannon of Troy, New York, was instructed to give a lot to each resident who was not otherwise provided for. Twenty-five lots were given away and the town was named in honor of Cannon, who acknowledged the honor with the gift of a small cannon engraved with his name and the date. A local legend has it that the cannon was buried in a local swamp after misfiring and killing a young man. The first record of the township separate from Plainfield is on April 6, 1846. Mention is made that the Michigan Legislature had organized the town under the name of "Churchtown" in the spring of 1846 (or 1845 in some sources). The name was soon after changed to Cannon, after the largest settlement. A post office was established on May 7, 1844, with the spelling as "Cannonsburgh". The spelling was changed to Cannonsburg on February 5, 1894. The Cannonsburg ZIP code 49317 provides P.O. Box only service. Cannonsburg continued to be at the center of township business through the end of the 20th Century when the township offices were moved to a new location 2 miles to the north, along the M-44 corridor.

Family Law Lawyers In Cannonsburg Michigan

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What is family law?

Family law is an area of the law that deals with family-related issues and domestic relations including the nature of marriage, civil unions, and domestic partnerships; issues arising during marriage, including spousal abuse, legitimacy, adoption, surrogacy, child abuse, and child abduction; the termination of the relationship and ancillary matters including divorce, annulment, property settlements, alimony, and parental responsibility orders (in the United States, child custody and visitation, child support and alimony awards).

Answers to family law issues in Michigan

Once you have been married, there are two ways to end a marriage, annulment or divorce. Both procedures depend...

If there are any children of the mar­riage, the court will have to award custody to one or both parties as part of...

The Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA) entitles eligible employees to take up to 12 weeks of unpaid, job-protected...