Hersey is a village in Osceola County in the U.S. state of Michigan. The population was 374 at the time of the 2000 census. The village is located within Hersey Township. Hersey is a small rural community that started as a lumber town in the early 1800s. The Hersey General Store, which was established in 1869, was lost to an arson fire on Labor Day 2008. The commercial district now consists of nothing, since a sole gas station/pizza house, the Hersey Party Store closed summer of 2009. The beautiful Rails to Trails bike and winter sports path passes through Hersey, running immediately to Reed City on the western side, and to Evart on the eastern. The village and a locally-run campground, Blodgett Landing, (www. blodgettlanding. com), are located at the confluence of the Hersey and Muskegon Rivers, two of the best trout streams in the state of Michigan. Located on the eastern edge of town lies a bridge with a clearance of 20 feet over the Muskegon River. This bridge-jumping-enthusiast's dream has long been a popular bridge-jumping site for youngsters and older on hot summer days.

Family Law Lawyers In Hersey Michigan

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What is family law?

Family law is an area of the law that deals with family-related issues and domestic relations including the nature of marriage, civil unions, and domestic partnerships; issues arising during marriage, including spousal abuse, legitimacy, adoption, surrogacy, child abuse, and child abduction; the termination of the relationship and ancillary matters including divorce, annulment, property settlements, alimony, and parental responsibility orders (in the United States, child custody and visitation, child support and alimony awards).

Answers to family law issues in Michigan

Once you have been married, there are two ways to end a marriage, annulment or divorce. Both procedures depend...

If there are any children of the marĀ­riage, the court will have to award custody to one or both parties as part of...

The Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA) entitles eligible employees to take up to 12 weeks of unpaid, job-protected...