Trenton is a small city in Wayne County in the southeast portion of the U.S. state of Michigan. As of the 2000 census, the city population was 19,584. The city is part of Downriver, a collection of mostly blue-collar communities south of Detroit on western bank of the Detroit River, thus "down-the-river. " Many residents are employed in the city's factories such as the Chrysler Trenton Engine Plant, Solutia, and the Detroit Edison Trenton Channel Power Plant. Oakwood South Shore Hospital (formerly known as Seaway Hospital) is located within city limits and has 203 beds. The former McLouth Steel plant is also located in the city. Norfolk Southern, CSX, and Canadian National provides rail service to the city. The city operates the 21,000-square-foot (2,000 m) Trenton Veterans Memorial Library and a historical museum. Trenton has 15 churches of 10 denominations. The Battle of Monguagon also took place in Trenton on the site of Elizabeth Park, which is part of the Wayne County Park System/Department of Parks and Rec. and is the first county park in Michigan, designated in 1919.

Family Law Lawyers In Trenton Michigan

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What is family law?

Family law is an area of the law that deals with family-related issues and domestic relations including the nature of marriage, civil unions, and domestic partnerships; issues arising during marriage, including spousal abuse, legitimacy, adoption, surrogacy, child abuse, and child abduction; the termination of the relationship and ancillary matters including divorce, annulment, property settlements, alimony, and parental responsibility orders (in the United States, child custody and visitation, child support and alimony awards).

Answers to family law issues in Michigan

Once you have been married, there are two ways to end a marriage, annulment or divorce. Both procedures depend...

If there are any children of the marĀ­riage, the court will have to award custody to one or both parties as part of...

The Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA) entitles eligible employees to take up to 12 weeks of unpaid, job-protected...