Leonardsville is a hamlet on the Unadilla River in the Town of Brookfield in Madison County, New York, USA. The community started as a number of small factories deriving power from a dam on the Unadilla River during the first decade of the 1800s. These were known locally as the shops and included a scythe and hoe factory, a blacksmith shop, a grist mill, a saw mill, a horse rake factory and wagon shop, and a foundry and machine shop. As with many small communities, Leonardsville was given its name by the Post Office Department, which in this case named if after Reuben Leonard who, in the early years, ran a local grocery and dry goods business that became a convenient location to drop off mail for local residents. In 1856, the grist mill, saw mill and agricultural implement factory were destroyed by fire, but were rebuilt immediately. Soon after that, the shops were purchased by the Babcock family who operated them until the 1930s, employing at their peak over 100 workers. Until the 1950s, when the manufacturing shops closed, Leonardsville was a stop on the Unadilla Valley Railroad, had a milk station (now a recycling center) and a feed store. None of the manufacturing buildings remain, but the former Crandall Department Store still stands and is now the regionally-known Horned Dorset Restaurant. Leonardsville had its own kindergarten through 12th grade central school until 1969, when the district merged with Bridgewater and West Winfield, creating the Mount Markham Central School district. The building was one of the new district's elementary schools until 2001, but now is used for specialized educational programs.

Intellectual Property Law Lawyers In Leonardsville New York

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What is intellectual property law?

Under intellectual property law, owners are granted certain exclusive rights to a variety of intangible assets, such as musical, literary, and artistic works; discoveries and inventions; and words, phrases, symbols, and designs. Common types of intellectual property include copyrights, trademarks, patents, industrial design rights and trade secrets. Intellectual property law involves advising and assisting individuals and businesses on the development, use, and protection of intellectual property -- which includes ideas, artistic creations, engineering processes, scientific inventions, and more.

Answers to intellectual property law issues in New York

A patent is a document issued by the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office (PTO) that grants a monopoly for a limited...

Some types of inventions will not qualify for a patent, no matter how interesting or important they are. For example...

In the context of a patent application, an invention is considered novel when it is different from all...

Once a patent is issued, it is up to the owner to enforce it. If friendly negotiations fail, enforcement involves...

Patent protection usually ends when the patent expires.

For all utility patents filed before June 8, 1995,...

Typically, inventor-employees who invent in the course of their employment are bound by employment agreements that...

On its own, a patent has no value. A patent becomes valuable only when a patent owner takes action to profit from...

Copyright protects works such as poetry, movies, video games, videos, DVDs, plays, paintings, sheet music, recorded...

For works published after 1977, the copyright lasts for the life of the author plus 70 years. However, if the work...

The term "trademark" is commonly used to describe many different types of devices that label, identify, and...

Federal court opinions concerning intellectual property law in New York